Entries in Delta (12)

Saturday
Jun182011

Delta Air Lines codeshare with Air Nigeria update

The codeshare agreement recently negotiated by Delta Air Lines and Air Nigeria is being gradually rolled out over the next few weeks.  The codeshare will be one-way, and will be very limited in scope, extending to only two round-trip routes, both operated by Delta.  Earlier this week, one of those routes went into effect, according to press releases from both airlines.  That route is Delta's round trip between its hub at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (IATA: ATL; ICAO: KATL) in Atlanta and Murtala Muhammed International Airport (IATA: LOS; ICAO: DNMM) in Lagos, the largest Nigerian city.  On July 4 this year, Delta's round trip between Kennedy International Airport (IATA: JFK; ICAO: KJFK) in New York and Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport (IATA: ABV; ICAO: DNAA) in Abuja, the Nigerian capital, will become part of the codeshare.

High-ranking representatives of both airlines were happy with the agreement.  Kinfe Kahssaye, CEO of Air Nigeria, praised the agreement as an important step toward positioning Nigeria as the primary African gateway between Africa and North America.  Delta's senior Vice President for Europe, the Middle East, and Africa, Perry Cantarutti, said that Africa is "an important part of Delta's international network strategy."  Delta is the only United States-based airline with two Nigerian destinations in its network.

Negotiations between venture capitalist Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group and the Nigerian government produced Virgin Nigeria Airways in 2004.  Virgin Nigeria Airways commenced operations in 2005, using the aforementioned Murtala Muhammed International Airport as its main hub.  In late 2009, Virgin Nigeria Airways rebranded itself as Nigerian Eagle Airlines.  Then in 2010, it rebranded itself again, as Air Nigeria, following acquisition by new owner Jimoh Ibrahim.

Delta Air Lines was founded as Huff Daland Dusters (a crop dusting company) in Louisiana in 1924.  It changed its name to Delta Air Service, and commenced operations as a passenger airline five years later.  Delta relocated its main offices to Atlanta, Georgia in 1941.  It completed a merger with Northwest Airlines in 2008.  Consolidation was accomplished in 2010.  It is the world's largest airline by fleet size, number of destinations, and passenger revenue.

original stories

Delta Starts Codeshare Flights with Air Nigeria (Delta Air Lines)

Delta Starts Codeshare Flights with Air Nigeria (Air Nigeria)

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Wednesday
Jun012011

Delta inaugurates New York-Iceland non-stop route

Delta Air Lines, the world's largest airline by passengers carried, is now the first United States-based carrier in 40 years to operate regular service between the New York metro area and Iceland non-stop.  Late this evening, at 11:35 EDT, the inaugural flight for this new route is scheduled to depart from Kennedy International Airport (IATA: JFK; ICAO: KJFK) in the New York borough of Queens.  The flight will be operated with the Boeing 757-200, according to Delta's press release on the subject, and is scheduled to arrive at Keflavík International Airport (IATA: KEF; ICAO: BIKF), at 9:20 in the morning the next day, local time.  The return flight is scheduled to leave Keflavík daily at 10:50 in the morning, local time, and arrive back in New York at 12:55 in the afternoon, local time.

Keflavík International is 31 miles (50 kilometers) west of the Icelandic capital city, Reykjavík.

Delta's senior vice president for New York, Gail Grimmett, mentioned the airline's emphasis on incorporating "unique destinations" and "growing but underserved global markets" into its list of destinations, suggesting that this new route targets both business travelers and leisure travelers.  Grimmett pointed out that Delta is now the only airline in the SkyTeam Alliance to offer a New York-Iceland route.

Delta Air Lines pilot John Magnusson made a blog post on Delta's official website earlier today, about his thoughts and feelings on being the pilot to fly the inaugural round trip.

The airline that became Delta Air Lines began flying passengers in 1929.  Delta relocated to Atlanta in 1941, and operates its largest hub at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta (IATA: ATL; ICAO: KATL).  It became the world’s largest airline by passengers carried when its merger with Northwest Airlines was completed last year.  Two other airlines fly non-stop between the New York metro area and Iceland.  Iceland's flag carrier airline Icelandair flies the route from Kennedy International and back, and the budget airline Iceland Express flies the route from Liberty International Airport (IATA: EWR; ICAO: KEWR) in Newark, New Jersey and back.

original stories

Delta Air Lines to Connect New York, Iceland (Delta Air Lines)

Captain's View: JFK Inaugural Flight to Iceland (Delta Air Lines)

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Thursday
May192011

Delta, Alitalia, and Air France-KLM will reduce capacity this fall

Anticipating a decrease in demand, the trans-Atlantic joint venture comprised of Delta Air Lines, Alitalia, and Air France-KLM has announced it will reduce its capacity in the trans-Atlantic market this coming autumn by "7 to 9 percent."  In a press release, it also cited rising fuel costs as a reason for the upcoming contraction in capacity.  However, the joint venture also plans to introduce seasonal routes via various warm weather destinations for this coming autumn and winter.

Delta Air Lines, an American carrier founded in 1924 and headquartered in Atlanta, is the largest airline in the world by several common measures.  Alitalia is the largest airline based in Italy, and was founded in 2008, following the bankruptcy of an airline with the same name and nearly identical branding, which had been in existence since 1946.  Netherlands-based KLM (established in 1919) and Air France (established in 1933) merged under a single holding company in 2004.

The four airlines established a joint venture last year.

original stories

Delta, Air France KLM and Alitalia to Reduce Trans-Atlantic Capacity in Fall 2011 (Delta Air Lines)

Delta, Air France-KLM Group and Alitalia to Reduce Trans-Atlantic Capacity in Fall 2011 (Air France)

Saturday
Sep112010

Delta and Hawaiian agree to codeshare flights

Starting next Wednesday, September 15, Delta Air Lines customers will be able to connect seamlessly to the inter-island network of Hawaiian Airlines.  This agreement expands upon a previous agreement which allows customers of each of the two airlines to redeem frequent flier miles with the other airline.  Flights which are part of the codeshare agreement will be available for purchase through Delta's website "and other ticketing channels" starting September 12.  Delta's managing director for alliances seemed particularly pleased with the upcoming alliance, according to a press release posted to the websites of both airlines.

The airline that became Delta Air Lines began flying passengers in 1929.  Delta relocated to Atlanta in 1941, and operates its largest hub at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta (IATA: ATL; ICAO: KATL).  It became the world’s largest airline by passengers carried when its merger with Northwest Airlines was completed earlier this year.  Hawaiian Airlines was founded in 1929 as Inter-island Airways.  The airline changed its name to Hawaiian Airlines in 1941.  Its main offices are in Honolulu, the Hawaiian state capital.  Its largest hub is at Honolulu International Airport (IATA: HNL; ICAO: PHNL).

related stories

Aegean and Continental agree to codeshare flights (August 26, 2010)

Turkish Airlines and US Airways codeshare effective September 1 (August 12, 2010)

Brussels Airlines and Continental Airlines codeshare (August 7, 2010)

American and JetBlue launch partnership at JFK and Logan (July 20, 2010)

BA-Iberia merger approved by the EU (July 14, 2010)

Alitalia joins network of Air France/KLM and Delta (July 5, 2010)

Qantas and China Eastern codeshare more flights (June 25, 2010)

JAL and AA take another step toward anti-trust immunity (June 24, 2010)

United Airlines and Jet Airways agree to codeshare (June 18, 2010)

original stories

Delta, Hawaiian Airlines sign codeshare agreement (Bloomberg BusinessWeek)

Hawaiian, Delta Sign Codeshare Agreement (Delta Air Lines)

Hawaiian, Delta Sign Codeshare Agreement - Delta customers gain seamless connections with Hawaiian Islands for the first time (Hawaiian Airlines)

Friday
Aug202010

Delta Air Lines plans sit-down restaurants at LaGuardia

Tomorrow, Delta Air Lines will open the first four of an eventual thirteen planned sit-down restaurants at its terminal at LaGuardia Airport in New York (IATA: LGA; ICAO: KLGA).  More "extensive security checks and flight delays" are cited by an expert on airline rules, as two reasons why airlines are making these changes.  LaGuardia will join a growing list of other airports around the country that boast recently upgraded airline terminal amenities.

"There's a wine bar at Philadelphia International Airport, a seafood restaurant at San Francisco International Airport, [and] an Asian bistro in Tucson International Airport," ABC News Online reported in its article on the subject.

Delta hired OTG Management to enact the changes, the same company that redesigned the JetBlue Airways terminal at Kennedy International (IATA: JFK; ICAO: KJFK) two years ago.  The remaining nine restaurants at LaGuardia Airport's Delta terminal will be open by next summer.

Tradition says inspiration for LaGuardia Airport came from a tirade launched by former New York mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, after landing in Newark, New Jersey, when his ticket said "New York."  LaGuardia demanded to be taken to Floyd Bennett Field, near where Kennedy International is now located, and discussed the need for a new airport in New York along the way.  LaGuardia Airport was constructed in the New York borough of Queens from 1937 to 1939.  As of 2009, Delta Air Lines had a plurality of the market share at the facility.

Delta Air Lines was founded as Huff Daland Dusters (a crop dusting company) in Louisiana in 1924.  It changed its name to Delta Air Service, and commenced operations as a passenger airline five years later.  Delta relocated its main offices to Atlanta, Georgia in 1941.  It completed a merger with Northwest Airlines in 2008.  Consolidation was accomplished earlier this year.  Delta's largest hub is Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (IATA: ATL; ICAO: KATL) in Atlanta.  It is the world's largest airline by fleet size, number of destinations, and passenger revenue.

original story (ABC News Online)

Friday
Aug132010

Delta allows complete booking on Facebook; redesigns website

Yesterday Delta Air Lines became the first carrier to allow travelers to purchase airfare through the social networking website Facebook.  Delta introduced this feature on its official Facebook page, which is "Liked" by over 35,700 Facebook users at the time of this post.  According to Bob Kupbens, Delta's Vice President for e-commerce, Facebook is the most visited website by users of Delta's In-flight Wi-Fi service.

Additionally, Delta has given its official website a new look.  The airline believes that the recently redesigned website will give visitors easier access to the features on the website they use most often.  Delta will launch a number of iPhone applications over the next couple months as well, including the ability to check in for a flight utilizing a smartphone.

The airline that became Delta Air Lines began flying passengers in 1929.  Delta relocated to Atlanta, Georgia (United States) in 1941.  Its largest hub is at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta (IATA: ATL; ICAO: KATL).  It became the world’s largest airline by passengers carried when its merger with Northwest Airlines was completed earlier this year.

original story (Delta Air Lines)

Monday
Jul262010

Delta subsidiary Comair fined by DOT for bumping improperly

The Erlanger, Kentucky-based subsidiary of Delta Air Lines was fined 275,000 USD by the Department of Transportation (DOT) today for bumping passengers from overbooked flights improperly.  The Aviation Enforcement Office of the Department of Transportation found that Comair denied compensation to bumped passengers, and resorted directly to involuntary removals, without first soliciting volunteers. These violations were disputed by a Delta Air Lines spokesperson, who said that Delta and its subsidiaries "fully comply" with the regulations set forth by the Department of Transportation, according to ABC News Online.

Airlines frequently intentionally overbook flights so that a plane will still be as full as possible, even if some ticketed passengers do not show up for their flight.  When more ticketed passengers show up to fly than there are seats on the plane, Transportation Department regulations require airlines to first ask for volunteers to fly on a later, less crowded flight.  These volunteers are required to be compensated for the inconvenience, according to Transportation Department regulations.  If after asking for volunteers the airplane is still crowded beyond capacity, then an airline is permitted to remove passengers without their consent, until the number of passengers aboard is no higher than the aircraft's seating capacity.  Ticketed passengers involuntarily bumped are "entitled to $800 in cash compensation," according to the Cincinnati Enquirer.  The Enquirer also noted that the Department of Transportation considered raising that to 1300 dollars this past June.

The airline that became Delta Air Lines began flying passengers in 1929.  Delta set up offices in Atlanta, Georgia in 1941, where the airline's headquarters remain today.  Its main hub is at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta (IATA: ATL; ICAO: KATL).  Delta agreed to merge with Northwest Airlines two years ago.  The merger was completed earlier this year.  Comair is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Delta Air Lines, founded in 1977.  It has been located in Erlanger, Kentucky ever since its founding.  Atlanta, New York, and Boston are focus cities for Comair, which flies to 70 destinations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and The Bahamas.  Its main hub is Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (IATA: CVG; ICAO: KCVG).

original stories

Delta Air Lines Subsidiary Fined for Bumping (ABC News)

US fines Comair for bumping (Cincinnati Enquirer)

Monday
Jul052010

Alitalia joins network of Air France/KLM and Delta

Today Alitalia, the highest-profile Italian-based airline, joined Air France, KLM, and Delta Air Lines in the largest trans-Atlantic joint venture of airlines.  The geographic scope of this network of airlines covers more than two thirds of the circumference of the Earth, from French Polynesia in the west, to India in the east.  Such a large network of airlines is enabled by anti-trust immunity granted to the member airlines by national and supra-national governments on both sides of the Atlantic.  This agreement among the four airlines allows Alitalia to remain in the network until at least 2022. 

Air France and KLM, the flag carriers of France and the Netherlands respectively, merged in 2004, although each airline has retained its own branding scheme and logos.  American-based Delta Air Lines merged with KLM partner Northwest Airlines in 2008, and joined this network in 2009.  The arrangement allows the member airlines to "share revenues and costs" associated with flying trans-Atlantic routes, according to a press release put out by Delta today.  Delta stated that this four-way alliance now represents more than a quarter of total capacity in trans-Atlantic passenger air travel.

related stories

Qantas and China Eastern codeshare more flights (June 25, 2010)

JAL and AA take another step toward anti-trust immunity (June 24, 2010)

United Airlines and Jet Airways agree to codeshare (June 18, 2010)

Malév and Etihad sign a codeshare deal (June 9, 2010)

The United-Continental merger is not yet a sure thing (May 19, 2010)

 Two airlines looking for awards in Hamburg next week made a deal (May 12, 2010)

United and Continental will probably merge (May 3, 2010)

original stories

Alitalia Joins Air France-KLM Group (Delta Air Lines)

Alitalia joins Air France-KLM Group, Delta Air Lines in industry’s leading trans-Atlantic joint venture (Air France)

Saturday
May222010

Asiana Airlines is Airline of the Year

South Korea-based Asiana Airlines was awarded the title “Airline of the Year” at the World Airline Awards in Hamburg on Thursday.  Malaysia-based Air Asia earned Best Low-Cost Airline.  And Dragonair, the short-haul subsidiary airline of Cathay Pacific, earned best regional airline.  No North American-based airline won first place in any category where all airlines were eligible.  U.K.-based Virgin Atlantic and Thomson Airways were the only European airlines to do so.  However, European carriers swept the top three places in Best Trans-Atlantic Airline (Virgin Atlantic, British Airways, Lufthansa).  Asian carriers did so in Best Trans-Pacific Airline (Cathay Pacific, Singapore Airlines, Asiana).

Air Canada won Best Airline in North America, followed by Delta Air Lines and Continental Airlines in second and third respectively.  (“North America” was defined as Canada, the United States, and Mexico.)  Lufthansa took home the European equivalent, followed by Swiss International Airlines, and Turkish Airlines in second and third, respectively.  (Turkish Airlines’ headquarters is in the Yesilkoy neighborhood of Istanbul on the European side of the city.  The airline’s main hub is Istanbul-Ataturk International Airport, IATA: IST; ICAO: LTBA, also on the European side of the city.)

Air New Zealand and Qantas Airways, the only two finalists for Airline of the Year from outside Asia, received fifth and seventh respectively.  Defending champion Cathay Pacific, the flag carrier of Hong Kong, received fourth place.  The overall winner, Asiana Airlines, was founded as Seoul Air International in 1988, and uses Seoul-Incheon International Airport (IATA: ICN; ICAO: RSKI) as its main hub.

related story

Airline of the Year will be named in Hamburg on May 20 (May 10, 2010)

original story (World Airline Awards)

Wednesday
May052010

Delta is offering a free checked bag to AMEX SkyMiles members

Air travelers who book with Delta Airlines and have one of six American Express Delta SkyMiles credit cards, will be entitled to one free checked bag per flight, beginning on June 1, Delta announced today.  This benefit can be utilized by up to nine people, one of which must be the American Express SkyMiles cardholder, on a single reservation with Delta.  The six American Express SkyMiles cards that are part of the offer are the (1) Gold Delta Personal Card, (2) Platinum Delta Personal Card, (3) Reserve Delta Personal Card, (4) Gold Delta Business Card, (5) Platinum Delta Business Card, and (6) Reserve Delta Business Card.

As of May 5, 2010, Delta currently charges up to $25.00 for a first checked bag, and up to $55.00 for a second, for bags that are not overweight or oversized.  According to Delta’s website, overweight bags are those that weigh more than 50 pounds.  Oversized bags are those whose length, width, and height, in inches, total a number higher than 62.  Charges for overweight and oversized bags on Delta flights can run into the hundreds of dollars USD.

It is not immediately obvious that the reservation must have been made with one of the abovementioned American Express Delta SkyMiles cards.  But one assumes reasonably that this is a requirement.

original story (Delta Air Lines)

Delta checked baggage allowances (Delta Air Lines)

Wednesday
May052010

Delta is angry at DOT and FAA for rejecting its time slot proposal

The largest American-based carrier criticized a decision of the Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration yesterday, in a joint statement made with US Airways, and threatened legal action in connection therewith.  The decision rejected a proposal to the USDOT put forward by Delta and US Airways, involving slot transactions with four other North American carriers (JetBlue, AirTran, Spirit, and WestJet, the latter a low-cost Canadian carrier operating out of Calgary, Alberta).  The proposal would have affected the various airlines’ time slots at Kennedy International in New York (IATA: JFK; ICAO: KJFK), and Reagan National in Washington, D.C. (IATA: DCA; ICAO: KDCA).

According to the Delta-US Airways joint response to the decision, approval of the proposal would have granted JetBlue additional access at strategically located DCA, and would have granted AirTran, Spirit, and WestJet additional access at JFK.  Delta also pointed out 7,000 jobs in the New York metropolitan area which it estimated would have been created if the proposal had been approved.

A slot in this context is a short period of time during which aircraft from a certain airline are permitted to take off from, or expected to arrive at, a certain airport.  All slots at large American airports are legally owned by the FAA, even though they are claimed as assets and valuated for accounting purposes by the airlines that use them.

The statement accused the USDOT and FAA of exceeding their statutory authority in rendering the decision.  The two airlines behind the statement said they would appeal the decision to the United States Court of Appeals (presumably for the Federal Circuit).

original story (US Airways)

Monday
May032010

United and Continental will probably merge

An agreement reached yesterday between the two American air carriers based in Chicago and Houston respectively, will probably result in an announcement later today, that Continental and United intend to merge into a single airline.  The parent company UAL Corporation, of which United Airlines is a wholly-owned subsidiary, will buy Continental.  The resulting airline will be called United and will be based in Chicago, United’s headquarters.  But it will eventually be run by Continental’s chief executive officer.

Just as with the Delta-Northwest merger initiated two years ago, this will probably be spun in a way that makes it seem like air travelers will benefit.  But residents of the Cincinnati, Ohio metropolitan area know better than that.  We have known for years that the reason Delta (even prior to its purchase of Northwest) has been able to charge such high fares for air travelers utilizing Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (IATA: CVG; ICAO: KCVG) is because it held such a high percentage of the market share at the facility.  This was true even prior to Delta’s purchase of Northwest, which was completed earlier this year.  Routes along which United and Continental have always competed for business will almost certainly rise in price due to this deal, even though the two constituent airlines might claim otherwise.

The two airlines claim that this will allow another very large, American-based carrier to compete on an international scale, just as Delta claims it is now able to do.  Perhaps it will.  But it also means one fewer airline competing for the domestic market for air travel.  This may therefore permit other domestic airlines not involved in the deal to raise fares on certain routes as well.  A careful look at federal anti-trust law is expected before the deal is allowed by the Department of Justice.

Have you ever flown on either one of these two airlines?  What was it like?  The first time I ever flew United, three years ago, half the expected passengers no-showed, and the flight was cancelled.  I sat at Dayton International Airport (IATA: DAY; ICAO: KDAY) for six hours before being put on a US Airways plane.  But my return to Dayton on United was uneventful and quite peaceful actually.  I have never flown Continental.

What do you think about these airlines?  What do you think about this move?  Comments are welcome.

original story (New York Times)